Science Experiments for Engaging Classrooms

experiments for engaging classroomsThis is my collection of simple science experiments for elementary kids. When choosing experiments for an elementary classroom, you will want them to cover each step of the Scientific Method you set up for your class should practice the basic science skills of lab safety, science tools, and the scientific method. Give them opportunities to practice these basic skills while investigating new science standards and concepts. This is how you work smarter, not harder and get more out of each class activity 🙂

Exciting Labs

Glowing Foam Explosion

Materials:

4Tbs (barely) warm water

2tsp yeast

1 cup hydrogen peroxide (The higher the percent

Hydrogen Peroxide, the thicker the foam. 3% was

used in this picture.)

5-10 drops food coloring

Glow Sticks ( at least 3)

3 drops of dish soap

Soda bottle

Tray

Instructions:

1.Place the empty soda bottle on a large tray.

2.Mix yeast and warm water together in a small bowl or beaker.

3.Pour the hydrogen peroxide into the soda bottle.

4.Add food coloring, dish soap, and glow stick liquid to the soda bottle. (Cut both ends of the glow stick to pour it into the bottle.)

5.Turn most/all of the lights off. It even looks neat in the light.

6.Add the yeast mixture to the soda bottle.

7.Watch the excitement!

**Don’t worry this does not explode all that big. A cookie tray is sufficient for catching the foam.

 

Earth Blobs Recipe:

Water Blob

6oz bottle glitter glue

3-5 pea sized drops liquid watercolor (blue)

2-3 drops liquid watercolor (green)

Blue glitter (as much as your heart desires)

1/3 cup liquid starch from the laundry aisle

Mix the glue, watercolors, and glitter in a bowl.

Add the starch in slowly, kneading with your hands. (It is sticky at first, but I promise it gets better.)

Land Blob

4oz bottle white glue

3-4 drops liquid watercolor (green)

1 drop liquid watercolor (yellow)

Blue glitter (as much as your heart desires)

1/3 cup liquid starch from the laundry aisle

Mix the glue, watercolors, and glitter in a bowl.

Add the starch in slowly, kneading with your hands. (It is sticky at first, but I promise it gets better.)

Once the two are done you can break them up into small sections so each student gets one. If you have a little blue and a little green for each student, they can roll them together to make a ball that looks like Earth!

***Do not put the blobs on paper! They absorb the paper, and you will never get it back…

***Save an extra blob for a lesson on gravity! They spread out and roll off a table ledge showing off the force of gravity.

TWO INGREDIENT GLITTER BLOBimg_9615

6 oz bottle of any glitter glue

1/3 cup liquid starch (add a little more if it is still too sticky)

Mix the glue and starch in a bowl. Add the starch in slowly, kneading with your hands. (It is sticky at first, but I promise it gets better.)

Lab Basics

Science Lab Basics

Need help creating a lab in your elementary classroom?  Some schools provide all the supplies you need, some reimburse you for your purchases, and some leave it up to you to fund your classroom supplies. Which ever is your situation, let’s look at a basic cost-effective list of supplies you can use to create a lab for your students. *Prices below were based on my shopping cart on Amazon.

1. Group desks together or use tables (Free)

2. Safety Goggles (Set of 6 for $24) Class set

3. Metric Rulers (Set of 36 for $17) Class set

4. Triple Beam Balance ($61) Either one for class demonstrations or one per table

5. Graduated Cylinders (3 for $7) Either one set for class demonstrations or one per table

6. Glass Beakers (3 for $7) Either one set for class demonstrations or one per table

7. Hand lenses ($5) One per table

8. Hot Plate ($15) One for demonstration purposes

9. Electric Circuit Supplies: Wire ($4 a roll), batteries(20 for $8) and holders ($4 each), light bulbs (10 for $5), switches ($14 each); ( a single group set up kit for $14) Have enough supplies on hand for each group to make a circuit with switches

10. Magnet Bar ($4) One per table

11. Microscope – Celestron Digital Microscope ($43) One for class demonstration is probably enough – This one has an attachment so you can put it on the projector or TV screen through your computer!

12. Prism and lens set ($19) One for demonstration purposes

13. Flashlights (4 for $8) One per table

14. Thermometers (10 for $13) One per table

Supplies to test and explore using this list of tools: paper clips, brads, rubber erasers, sand, water, food coloring, rocks, oil, leaves, paper, foil, … this list can go on forever! Most things you will already have in your classroom. As labs come up throughout the year, collect and reuse any items you can. Put out emails to friends and staff to collect items you need for labs. Watch garage sales and store clearance sections for good buys. You can also ask local stores and businesses to donate supplies that you need. Most places are happy to help out!

The Scientific Method:

the scientific method

Labs and Experiments for your elementary classroom:

Here is an experiment with a testable hypothesis.
science labscience for kids
Magnet Bottle with Nails

Materials: Several nails or screws, clear bottle, strong magnet.
Question: How many nails will the magnet hold when I roll the bottle around one time.

 

 

 

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